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RESOURCES

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National


24 Hour Crisis Hotlines

Are you considering suicide? There are people you can talk to and who can help you.

 

National


24 Hour Crisis Hotlines

Are you considering suicide? There are people you can talk to and who can help you.

 

National Suicide Prevention Hotline
1-800-273-TALK (8255) 

Whether you are personally in crisis or you are concerned about someone who is, you can ALWAYS call 1-800-273-TALK and get a listening ear, resources, and support 24 hours a day, seven days a week. This hotline does not close on the weekend, holidays, or during bad weather.

Veterans, please press 1.
En español oprima el 2
For hearing & speech impaired with TTY equipment : 1-800-799-4TTY (4889)

The Trevor Project
1-866-4-U-TREVOR

This is also a free, confidential 24-hour hotline. It focuses on crises and suicide prevention among gay, lesbian, bisexual, and transgender youth.

Trans Lifeline
877-565-8860

Crisis Hotline by and for the transgender community.

Crisis Text Line
741-741

Text START to 741-741 to talk to a trained counselor. It's free, confidential, and available 24/7.

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Faith-Based


Faith-Based Suicide
Prevention Resources

Faith-Based


Faith-Based Suicide
Prevention Resources

Recommendations for Religious Services and Other Public Memorial Observances

This is a guide to help community and faith leaders who plan memorial observances and provide support for individuals after the loss of a loved one to suicide.


Help at Hand: Supporting Survivors of Suicide Loss
A Guide for Funeral Directors

This 16-page brochure for funeral directors who are working with suicide survivors covers what's different about suicide deaths, tending to the complex needs of survivors, and dealing with compassion fatigue.
 

Mental Health Ministries

This is an interactive web based ministry to provide educational resources to help erase the stigma of mental illness in our faith communities. Their mission is to help faith communities be caring congregations for people living with a mental illness and those who love and care for them. Resources can be adapted to the unique needs of each faith community.
 

Pathways to Promise

This is an interfaith cooperative of many faith groups. They provide assistance and are a resource center which offers liturgical and educational materials, program models, caring ministry with people experiencing a mental illness and their families.
 

The Role of Faith Communities in Preventing Suicide :
A Report of an Interfaith Suicide Prevention Dialogue

This report is the result of leaders convened by the Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration (SAMHSA) to further the progress of faith communities in preventing suicide, and was developed by the Suicide Prevention Resource Center (SPRC). Participants included representatives of the five largest faith groups in the United States: Christian, Jewish, Islamic, Buddhist, and Hindu.
 

The Role of Faith Communities in Suicide Prevention:
A Guidebook for Faith Leaders

The purpose of this guidebook is to prepare leaders of faith communities to prevent, intervene and respond to the tragedy of suicide.

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Medical


Healthcare System

Medical


Healthcare System

Suicide Care in Systems Framework  

This report presents the findings and recommendations of the Clinical Care and Intervention Task Force to the National Action Alliance for Suicide Prevention. The Task Force focused its deliberations and recommendations on care in four environments:

(1) Emergency Departments and Medical-Surgical Units;
(2) Primary Care and General Medical Settings;
(3) Behavioral Health Entities; and
(4) Crisis Services.

And, while much of our concept of care lies in traditional face-to-face service delivery between clinicians and patients, the Task Force recognizes and has incorporated the growing use of technology to deliver care (e.g., telephone lines, e-help, texting, blogs, and social networks).

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After A Suicide


After a Suicide

After A Suicide


After a Suicide

// After a Suicide Death: Ten Tips for Helping Children & Teens // 

1. Tell the truth.
It’s important to be honest with children and teens. They don’t necessarily need to know every single fact about a death, but they do need to hear truthful answers and information. Start with a short
explanation of what has happened, and let their questions guide how much detail you provide.

2. Expect and allow for different emotions and feelings.
Feelings and grief reactions are influenced by many factors, including the age, personality and
developmental level of the child. You may see a broad spectrum of emotions in children and teens,
including anger, frustration, guilt, numbness, shock, sadness, relief, confusion, shame, fear, loneliness
and embarrassment.

3. Talk openly about suicide.
Our society continues to stigmatize suicide, as well as the families of those left behind. It is often
an uncomfortable and shocking topic that can leave people unsure of what to say. In light of this
challenge, it is critical that kids have safe places where they can talk openly about the death without
judgement and awkwardness.

4. Hold a memorial service.
No matter how difficult or painful the deceased person’s life or death may have been, grieving children
and teens deserve the opportunity to say goodbye and to honor the person’s life.

5. Talk about and remember the person who died.
Don’t be afraid to talk about and remember the person who died. Remembering is part of grieving.

6. Share information about depression and mental illness.
Suicide is not usually a random act - it occurs in a context. Although no one knows what causes
suicide, most people who die of suicide have experienced some form of depression or mental illness.
It helps children to know that the person who died was in fact suffering from a kind of illness in his or
her thinking.

7. Be prepared for fears.
After a suicide death, children have many fears. During these times, it is helpful for trusted adults to
stay connected and listen to their questions and concerns. Offer reassurance without making promises
such as, “This will never happen again.”

8. Inform the child’s school about the death.
Children spend a lot of time in school and a death affects not only family life but school life. That is
why it’s important to inform a child’s teacher, counselor, coaches, and any adult support person in the
school setting about the death. Talk with your child about what they would like in terms of sharing the
news with their classmates and others in the school.

9. Provide outlets for grieving: Play, physical activity, art...
Play is a natural outlet of expression for children. While adults tend to talk out (or hold in) their grief,
children are more likely to express it through play. This is one way you can validate their experiences
and help them regain a sense of balance and control.

10. Respect differences in grieving styles.
Children’s grieving styles - even in the same family - can be very different. Some kids want to talk
about the death, while others want to be left alone. Recognizing and respecting that each person
grieves in his or her own way is essential.

Source: http://www.dougy.org/

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Work


Suicide in the Workplace

Work


Suicide in the Workplace

A Manager’s Guide to Suicide Postvention in the Workplace:
10 Action Steps for Dealing with the Aftermath of Suicide

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Media/Reporting


Safe Media Reporting

Media/Reporting


Safe Media Reporting

Why does reporting suicide safely matter?

While recommendations exist to assist news and entertainment professionals in covering suicide prevention safely, little guidance has been available for those in suicide prevention and behavioral health to effectively communicate to the public about suicide. The Action Alliance Framework for Successful Messaging outlines how individuals and organizations working in suicide prevention and behavioral health promotion can promote hope, help, and resilience, and ultimately help save lives. 

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Training


Get Trained in
Suicide Prevention

Training


Get Trained in
Suicide Prevention

There are several excellent trainings available to the public that teach the knowledge and skills to be an effective "gatekeeper" for people who are thinking about suicide. A gatekeeper is someone who is able and willing to help someone thinking about suicide get professional help.

SCYSPI Trainings Available

If you are interested in hosting or signing up for any of these trainings please email Alex Karydi at alexandra.karydi@scdmh.org